Secret to success in science

Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be knownAs a student of science, it is vital that you stay abreast with the developments in science and technology. Research can be a great source of inspiration and growth in your life as a student. Reading about what’s happening in the world of medicine worldwide will help you understand your studies better and give you clarity about the areas you may want to specialise in. So troll science websites and start hitting the library to pick up journals. You never know what you may be inspired to do with the next article you read.

Here’s a couple of titbits:

Recently, Ahok K. Shetty, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, associate director of the Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and research career scientist at the Central Texas Veterans Health Care System, and his team at the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine, is looking at how to replace brain cells and restore memory. Research like this has far-reaching benefits especially for those who suffer from dementia and other age-related illnesses. His findings were published in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine.

Leading autism treatment provider, Center for Autism and Related Disorders (CARD), in a joint study with Chapman University is looking at the effects of variables in treating autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Results revealed important determinations in regards to supervision, with experience of the supervisor directing impacting the individual being treated. Studies like these will help practitioners make better decisions about clinical standards of care.

If you are interested in one day contributing to areas of science and medicine like these researchers, the place to start is here. With the right foundation and choice of medical school, you will be on your way to change the world of medicine through your contribution.

Social media linked to depression, say researchers

broken arm hung head, man fingers arms

The journal Depression and Anxiety published research from the University of Pittsburgh school of Medicine in Pennsylvania, US, linking the use of social media to depression. A total of 1,787 adults in the US aged 19-32 were surveyed about their social media usage on sites such as Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Google Plus, Instagram, Snapchat, Reddit, Tumblr, Pinterest, Vine and LinkedIn.

Of the participants, more than 25% had high indicators of depression, with those who checked their social media more often being more likely to be depressed than those who checked it less.

Now there’s food for thought! Question is, should you share this on your Facebook?

More on this can be found here.